Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro

If climbing mountains is your passion, then the Kilimanjaro challenge will take your breath away. Rising to 19,340 ft., it is the tallest free standing mountain in the world. Most of the area Kilimanjaro is defined by the Kilimanjaro National Park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Unlike climbing the mountains in the Himalayas, this mountain requires no expensive mountaineering equipment, nor do you need mountaineering experience. This also means that the cost to climb Kilimanjaro is significantly less. What you do need though, is to be in excellent physical shape. Don’t underestimate the climb.  Summit day is the most demanding portion of the climb, typically involving 8 hours for the ascent and 6-7 hours for the descent. You will require strength & endurance. Being in top physical condition is the single most important aspect for climbers to maximize their climbing potential. The better your physical condition, the more likely you are to perform well and have an enjoyable experience. Start training early if you have plans to climb this mountain. The most common problem is altitude sickness and no one is immune from that possibility.

Mt. Kilimanjaro comprises three distinct volcanic cones: Kibo 19,340 feet (5,895 meters) Mawenzi 16,896 feet (5,149 meters) Shira 13,000 feet (3,962 meters) There are five common routes used to climb Kilimanjaro: Machame, Marangu, Lemosho, Rongai and Umbwe. Uhuru peak is the highest summit of Kilimanjaro. The highest peak on Mawenzi is Hans Meyer Point, which can only be reached by mountaineers. Kilimanjaro contains a wide array of ecosystems on earth – glacier, snowfields, deserts, alpine moorland, savannah, and tropical jungle. The Town of Moshi which is not too far from the summit is the most common base for climbers.

 

When to go?

Clearest and warmest conditions from December to February, but also dry (and colder) from July-September.
Plan on spending at least 6 days (5 nights) on the mountain. The Kilimanjaro Park Guide is followed. (-1) indidates the trip could be shortened by a day.

Lemosho Route

The Lemosho route is one of our preferred routes due to its low traffic, beautiful scenery and a high summit success rate. Long access drive, remote, less frequented, beautiful forests, scenic traverse to Barafu, camping. Excellent for acclimatization.

8(-1) Days: 56km.

Machame Route

The Machame route, also referred to as the Whiskey route, is one of the most popular routes on Kilimanjaro and a favorite for us. Second most popular route. Beautiful forest, very good for acclimatization, scenic traverse to Barafu.

7(-1) Days: 49km.

Marangu Route

The Marangu route (also known as the “Coca-Cola” route) is one of the most popular and easiest routes up Kilimanjaro, of course that doesn’t mean that it’s easy! Very popular. Gentle gradients and long sections up to 4700m. Beautiful forests and moorlands, comfortable but basic huts. The 6 day variant provides good time for acclimatization..

6(-1) Days: 64km.

Rongai Route

Starting from the northeastern side of the mountain near the Kenyan border, the Rongai Route rises above the Amboseli plains and approach the summit of Kilimanjaro west of the Mawenzi peak. Long access drive, remote, less frequented, some fine, wild, high-altitude mountain scenery, camping. Good for acclimatization.

7 Days: 65km

Umbwe Route

The Umbwe route has a well-deserved reputation of being the most challenging route on Mount Kilimanjaro.

9 Day Northern Circuit

The Northern Circuit is the newest, longest and most rewarding route on Mount Kilimanjaro.

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